Life and Miracles of St Benedict

Author: Pope Gregory I
Publisher: Liturgical Press
Size: 44.23 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Category : History
Pages : 87
Life and Miracles of St Benedict GET EBOOK
A translation of the biography written by Pope Gregory the Great, this official biography is also known as the Second Book of Dialogues. It is the earliest and thus the most valuable biography of St. Benedict.
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The Life and Miracles of St. Benedict
Language: en
Pages: 130
Authors: St Gregory the Great
Categories:
Type: BOOK - Published: 2015-02-15 - Publisher:

Books about The Life and Miracles of St. Benedict
Life and Miracles of St. Benedict
Language: en
Pages: 87
Authors: Pope Gregory I
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 1980 - Publisher: Liturgical Press

A translation of the biography written by Pope Gregory the Great, this official biography is also known as the Second Book of Dialogues. It is the earliest and thus the most valuable biography of St. Benedict.
The Life and Miracles of St. Benedict
Language: en
Pages: 98
Authors: Pope Gregory I
Categories: Christian saints
Type: BOOK - Published: 1880 - Publisher:

Books about The Life and Miracles of St. Benedict
The Life of Saint Benedict
Language: en
Pages: 160
Authors: Pope Gregory I, Terrence Kardong
Categories: Biography & Autobiography
Type: BOOK - Published: 2009 - Publisher: Liturgical Press

In his classic Second Book of Dialogues, Pope Gregory the Great lionizes Saint Benedict as hero and casts him predominantly in the role of miracle worker. Yet in his Rule, Benedict comes across more as a practical community organizer and premier spiritual father. In this volume, Terrence Kardong offers a fresh take on Gregory the Great's classic. He alternates between translated sections of the Diablo's and his own commentary. Crisp and direct, and infused with his wry and ever-present sense of humor, Kardong's writings sure to build up the spiritual life of readers and, equally important, to make them love St. Benedict. .
The Life and Miracles of St. Benedict
Language: en
Pages: 116
Authors: Saint Gregory the Great, Gregory
Categories: Biography & Autobiography
Type: BOOK - Published: 2007-06-01 - Publisher: Cosimo, Inc.

Books about The Life and Miracles of St. Benedict
The Life and Miracles of St Benedict
Language: en
Pages: 146
Authors: St Gregory the Great
Categories: Biography & Autobiography
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-03-29 - Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

Excerpt: THERE was a man of venerable life, Benedict by name and grace, who from the time of his very childhood carried the heart of an old man. His demeanour indeed surpassing his age, he gave himself no disport or pleasure, but living here upon earth he despised the world with all the glory thereof, at such time as he might have most freely enjoyed it. He was born in the province of Nursia of honourable parentage and sent to Rome to study the liberal sciences. But when he saw there many through the uneven paths of vice run headlong to their own ruin, he drew back his foot, but new-set in the world, lest, in the search of human knowledge, he might also fall into the same dangerous precipice. Contemning therefore learning and studies and abandoning his father's house and goods, he desired only to please God in a virtuous life. Therefore he departed skilfully ignorant and wisely unlearned. I have not attained unto all this man did, but the few things which I here setdown, were related to me by four of his disciples; namely, Constantine, a very reverend man, who succeeded him in the government of the Monastery; Valentinian, who for many years bore rule in the Monastery of Lateran; Simplicius, who was the third superior of that congregation after him; and Honoratus who yet governeth the Monastery which he first inhabited. CHAPTER I. Benedict having now left the schools resolved to betake himself to the desert, accompanied only by his nurse who most tenderly loved him. Coming therefore to a place called Affile, and remaining for some time in the Church of St. Peter by the charitable invitement of many virtuous people who lived there for devotion, so it chanced that his nurse borrowed of a neighbour a sieve to cleanse wheat, which being left carelessly upon the table was found broken in two pieces. Therefore on her return finding it broke, she began to weep bitterly because it was only lent her. But the religious and pious boy, Benedict, seeing his nurse lament was moved with compassion, and taking with him the two pieces of the broken sieve, with tears he gave himself to prayer, which no sooner ended, but he found the sieve whole, and found not any sign that it had been broken. Then presently he restored the sieve which had been broken, whole to his nurse, to her exceeding comfort. This matter was divulged unto all that lived thereabout, and so much admired by all, that the inhabitants of that place caused the sieve to be hanged up in the Church porch, that not only those present, but all posterity might know with how great gifts of grace Benedict had been endowed from the beginning of his conversion. The sieve remained to be seen for many years after, and hung over the Church door even until the times of the Longobards. But Benedict more desirous to suffer afflictions than covetous of praise; and rather willing to undergo labours for the honour of God, than to be extolled with the favours of this world, fled secretly from his nurse to a remote place in the desert called Subiaco, distant about forty miles from Rome, in which a fountain springing with cool and crystal waters, extendeth itself at first into a broad lake, and running farther with increase of waters becometh at the last a river.
Life and Miracles of Saint Benedict
Language: en
Pages: 87
Authors: Pope Gregory I
Categories: Biography & Autobiography
Type: BOOK - Published: 1949 - Publisher:

Books about Life and Miracles of Saint Benedict
The Life and Miracles of St Benedict
Language: en
Pages: 270
Authors: St Gregory the Great
Categories: Biography & Autobiography
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-10-07 - Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

Excerpt: THERE was a man of venerable life, Benedict by name and grace, who from the time of his very childhood carried the heart of an old man. His demeanour indeed surpassing his age, he gave himself no disport or pleasure, but living here upon earth he despised the world with all the glory thereof, at such time as he might have most freely enjoyed it. He was born in the province of Nursia of honourable parentage and sent to Rome to study the liberal sciences. But when he saw there many through the uneven paths of vice run headlong to their own ruin, he drew back his foot, but new-set in the world, lest, in the search of human knowledge, he might also fall into the same dangerous precipice. Contemning therefore learning and studies and abandoning his father's house and goods, he desired only to please God in a virtuous life. Therefore he departed skilfully ignorant and wisely unlearned. I have not attained unto all this man did, but the few things which I here setdown, were related to me by four of his disciples; namely, Constantine, a very reverend man, who succeeded him in the government of the Monastery; Valentinian, who for many years bore rule in the Monastery of Lateran; Simplicius, who was the third superior of that congregation after him; and Honoratus who yet governeth the Monastery which he first inhabited. CHAPTER I. Benedict having now left the schools resolved to betake himself to the desert, accompanied only by his nurse who most tenderly loved him. Coming therefore to a place called Affile, and remaining for some time in the Church of St. Peter by the charitable invitement of many virtuous people who lived there for devotion, so it chanced that his nurse borrowed of a neighbour a sieve to cleanse wheat, which being left carelessly upon the table was found broken in two pieces. Therefore on her return finding it broke, she began to weep bitterly because it was only lent her. But the religious and pious boy, Benedict, seeing his nurse lament was moved with compassion, and taking with him the two pieces of the broken sieve, with tears he gave himself to prayer, which no sooner ended, but he found the sieve whole, and found not any sign that it had been broken. Then presently he restored the sieve which had been broken, whole to his nurse, to her exceeding comfort. This matter was divulged unto all that lived thereabout, and so much admired by all, that the inhabitants of that place caused the sieve to be hanged up in the Church porch, that not only those present, but all posterity might know with how great gifts of grace Benedict had been endowed from the beginning of his conversion. The sieve remained to be seen for many years after, and hung over the Church door even until the times of the Longobards. But Benedict more desirous to suffer afflictions than covetous of praise; and rather willing to undergo labours for the honour of God, than to be extolled with the favours of this world, fled secretly from his nurse to a remote place in the desert called Subiaco, distant about forty miles from Rome, in which a fountain springing with cool and crystal waters, extendeth itself at first into a broad lake, and running farther with increase of waters becometh at the last a river.
The Life and Miracles of St Benedict
Language: en
Pages: 146
Authors: St Gregory St Gregory the Great
Categories: Biography & Autobiography
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-10-05 - Publisher:

Excerpt: THERE was a man of venerable life, Benedict by name and grace, who from the time of his very childhood carried the heart of an old man. His demeanour indeed surpassing his age, he gave himself no disport or pleasure, but living here upon earth he despised the world with all the glory thereof, at such time as he might have most freely enjoyed it. He was born in the province of Nursia of honourable parentage and sent to Rome to study the liberal sciences. But when he saw there many through the uneven paths of vice run headlong to their own ruin, he drew back his foot, but new-set in the world, lest, in the search of human knowledge, he might also fall into the same dangerous precipice. Contemning therefore learning and studies and abandoning his father's house and goods, he desired only to please God in a virtuous life. Therefore he departed skilfully ignorant and wisely unlearned. I have not attained unto all this man did, but the few things which I here setdown, were related to me by four of his disciples; namely, Constantine, a very reverend man, who succeeded him in the government of the Monastery; Valentinian, who for many years bore rule in the Monastery of Lateran; Simplicius, who was the third superior of that congregation after him; and Honoratus who yet governeth the Monastery which he first inhabited. CHAPTER I. Benedict having now left the schools resolved to betake himself to the desert, accompanied only by his nurse who most tenderly loved him. Coming therefore to a place called Affile, and remaining for some time in the Church of St. Peter by the charitable invitement of many virtuous people who lived there for devotion, so it chanced that his nurse borrowed of a neighbour a sieve to cleanse wheat, which being left carelessly upon the table was found broken in two pieces. Therefore on her return finding it broke, she began to weep bitterly because it was only lent her. But the religious and pious boy, Benedict, seeing his nurse lament was moved with compassion, and taking with him the two pieces of the broken sieve, with tears he gave himself to prayer, which no sooner ended, but he found the sieve whole, and found not any sign that it had been broken. Then presently he restored the sieve which had been broken, whole to his nurse, to her exceeding comfort. This matter was divulged unto all that lived thereabout, and so much admired by all, that the inhabitants of that place caused the sieve to be hanged up in the Church porch, that not only those present, but all posterity might know with how great gifts of grace Benedict had been endowed from the beginning of his conversion. The sieve remained to be seen for many years after, and hung over the Church door even until the times of the Longobards. But Benedict more desirous to suffer afflictions than covetous of praise; and rather willing to undergo labours for the honour of God, than to be extolled with the favours of this world, fled secretly from his nurse to a remote place in the desert called Subiaco, distant about forty miles from Rome, in which a fountain springing with cool and crystal waters, extendeth itself at first into a broad lake, and running farther with increase of waters becometh at the last a river.
The life and miracles of st. Benedict, from an old Engl. version by P.W., ed. by E.J. Luck
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Gregory I ((st) pope.)
Categories: Biography & Autobiography
Type: BOOK - Published: 1880 - Publisher:

Books about The life and miracles of st. Benedict, from an old Engl. version by P.W., ed. by E.J. Luck
The Life and Miracles of St. Benedict
Language: en
Pages: 160
Authors: Saint Great, St. Gregory the Great, Edmund J. Luck, Brother Hermenegild
Categories: Religion
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-04-10 - Publisher: CreateSpace

The present volume reproduces a work of antiquity, which describes the Life and Miracles of St. Benedict in a narrative full of beautiful simplicity and filial love-a narrative whose every page bears the impress of patristic authority and monastic devotedness. This narrative flows from no less distinguished a pen than that of the Monk-Pope St. Gregory the Great. He writes with the credentials of the Vicar of Jesus Christ upon earth, and is supported by the testimony of those who were at the same time eye-witnesses of the facts he describes, and his own intimate and cherished brethren in religion. Hence the filial admiration which he displays of the' Venerable Father' who, as he says, ' wrote a rule for his monks, both excellent for discretion and also eloquent for the style.' J'he translation which is here presented to the reader is also itself a relic of antiquity, having been first published in Paris in 1608. However, before speaking of the old English version, it will be well to premise a few remarks on St. Gregory's Book of 'Dialogues, ' from which the Life of St. Benedict is taken, and which constitutes the matter presented under this particular form. The second book of the 'Dialoguecs' of St. Gregory is given in its entirety to the narration of the Life and Miracles of St. Benedict. We must not, however, expect to find a finished biography of the Saint. According to the generally accepted signification of the word, we expect to find in a biography a chronological and consecutive account of the actions of the person who forms the subject of the narrative, with a more or less complete recital of the undertakings in which he was engaged and which have rendered his name celebrated; besides this-if the subject of the biography' comes within the range of hagiology-we look, moreover, for a detailed and classified rehearsal of his heroic virtues, confirmed and illustrated by a variety of miraculous manifestations of his sanctity. Now this is not precisely what St. Gregory proposed to lfimself to accomplish, and we must not therefore expect in the following pages a finished and complete biography of St. Benedict. What was the precise object St. Gregory had in view in writing the four books of his t Dialogues' we are told in the touching introduction with which the holy Monk Pope himself prefaces his work, and which I here transcribe from the same old English version already mentioned: 'Being upon a certain day too much overcharged with the troubles of worldly business, in which oftentimes men are enforced to do more than of duty they are bound, I retired myself into a solitary place, very fit for a sad and melancholy disposition, where each discontentment and dislike concerning such secular affairs might plainly show themselves, and all things that usually bring grief, mustered together, might freely be presented before mine eyes. In' which place, after that I had sat a long while in much silence and great sorrow of soul, at length Peter, my dear son and deacon, came unto me-a man whom, from his younger years, I had always loved most entirely, and used him for my companion in the study of Sacred Scripture: who, seeing me drowned in such a depth of sorrow, spake unto me in this manner: "What is the matter? or what bad news have you heard? for, certain I am, that some extraordinary sadness doth now afflict your mind." ..."
The Life of St. Benedict
Language: en
Pages: 70
Authors: Pope St. Gregory the Great
Categories: Religion
Type: BOOK - Published: 2011-12-07 - Publisher: TAN Books

The famous, classic life of St. Benedict, filled with miracles, holy stories and inspiring idealism. Delightful reading for all ages. Describes much of what is known about St. Benedict, including the founding of the Benedictine order.