Children s Informal Ideas in Science

Author: P. J. Black
Publisher: Routledge
Size: 45.71 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Category : Education
Pages : 260
Children s Informal Ideas in Science GET EBOOK
The ideas that children have about science concepts have for the past decade been the subject of a wealth of international research. But while the area has been strong in terms of data, it has suffered from a lack of theory. Children's Informal Ideas in Science addresses the question of whether children's ideas about science can be explained in a single theoretical framework. Twelve different approaches combine to tackle this central issue, each taking a deliberately critical standpoint. The contributors address such themes as values in research, the social construction of knowledge and the work of Piaget in a rich contribution to the debate without claiming finally to resolve it. The authors conclude with a discussion of how a theory can be built up, along with suggestions for ways ahead in the research.
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