RELATED BOOKS
Athenian Politics C800-500 BC
Language: en
Pages: 240
Authors: G. R. Stanton
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2002-11-01 - Publisher: Routledge

First published in 1990. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Athenian Politics, C. 800-500 B.C.
Language: en
Pages: 226
Authors: G. R. Stanton
Categories: Athens (Greece)
Type: BOOK - Published: 1990 - Publisher:

Books about Athenian Politics, C. 800-500 B.C.
Athenian Politics c800-500 BC
Language: en
Pages: 240
Authors: G. R. Stanton
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2002-11-01 - Publisher: Routledge

First published in 1990. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Athenian Politics, C. 800 - 500 B.C.
Language: en
Pages: 226
Authors: Greg R. Stanton
Categories: Athens
Type: BOOK - Published: 1990 - Publisher:

"Athenian Politics" examines the limitations and problems attendant upon the use of traditional sources to understand Athenian history. Presenting, in translation, virtually all the sources from which scholars have drawn their conclusions about ancient Athenian society--from contemporary accounts and stone inscriptions to Egyptian papyri--Stanton challenges the way scholars have viewed ancient Athens. Covering the period from the reforms of Solon to the constitutional changes of Kleisthenes, "Athenian Politics" explores democracy's paradoxical emergence from the actions of an undemocratic noble elite.
Athenian Democracy
Language: en
Pages: 112
Authors: John Thorley
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2005-06-20 - Publisher: Routledge

This pamphlet outlines the development and operation of Athenian democracy to the end of the fifth century BC. Separate sections examine the prelude to democracy, the emergence of a democratic system, and the way this system worked in practice. A final section focuses on the questions: how should we judge the success of Athenian democracy? who benefitted? was it an efficient system of government? in what sense was Athenian democracy the forerunner of modern democracies?
Athenian Democracy
Language: en
Pages: 304
Authors: Rhodes P. J. Rhodes
Categories: HISTORY
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-08-07 - Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

Athens' democracy developed during the sixth and fifth centuries and continued into the fourth; Athens' defeat by Macedon in 322 began a series of alternations between democracy and oligarchy. The democracy was inseparably bound up with the ideals of liberty and equality, the rule of law, and the direct government of the people by the people. Liberty meant above all freedom of speech, the right to be heard in the public assembly and the right to speak one's mind in private. Equality meant the equal right of the male citizens (perhaps 60,000 in the fifth century, 30,000 in the fourth) to participate in the government of the state and the administration of the law. Disapproved of as mob rule until the nineteenth century, the institutions of Athenian democracy have become an inspiration for modern democratic politics and political philosophy. P. J. Rhodes's reader focuses on the political institutions, political activity, history, and nature of Athenian democracy and introduces some of the best British, American, German and French scholarship on its origins, theory and practice. Part I is devoted to political institutions: citizenship, the assembly, the law-courts, and capital punishment. Part II explores aspects of political activity: the demagogues and their relationship with the assembly, the manoeuvrings of the politicians, competitive festivals, and the separation of public from private life. Part III looks at three crucial points in the development of the democracy: the reforms of Solon, Cleisthenes and Ephialtes. Part IV considers what it was in Greek life that led to the development of democracy. Some of the authors adopt broad-brush approaches to major questions; others analyse a particular body of evidence in detail. Use is made of archaeology, comparison with other societies, the location of festivals in their civic context, and the need to penetrate behind what the classical Athenians made of their past.
Ancient Greek Democracy
Language: en
Pages: 352
Authors: Eric W. Robinson
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2008-04-15 - Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

This book invites readers to join in a fresh and extensive investigation of one of Ancient Greece’s greatest inventions: democratic government. Provides an accessible, up-to-date survey of vital issues in Greek democracy. Covers democracy’s origins, growth and essential nature. Raises questions of continuing interest. Combines ancient texts in translation and recent scholarly articles. Invites the reader into a process of historical investigation. Contains maps, a glossary and an index.
The Rise and Fall of Classical Greece
Language: en
Pages: 448
Authors: Josiah Ober
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-10-04 - Publisher: Princeton University Press

A major new history of classical Greece—how it rose, how it fell, and what we can learn from it Lord Byron described Greece as great, fallen, and immortal, a characterization more apt than he knew. Through most of its long history, Greece was poor. But in the classical era, Greece was densely populated and highly urbanized. Many surprisingly healthy Greeks lived in remarkably big houses and worked for high wages at specialized occupations. Middle-class spending drove sustained economic growth and classical wealth produced a stunning cultural efflorescence lasting hundreds of years. Why did Greece reach such heights in the classical period—and why only then? And how, after "the Greek miracle" had endured for centuries, did the Macedonians defeat the Greeks, seemingly bringing an end to their glory? Drawing on a massive body of newly available data and employing novel approaches to evidence, Josiah Ober offers a major new history of classical Greece and an unprecedented account of its rise and fall. Ober argues that Greece's rise was no miracle but rather the result of political breakthroughs and economic development. The extraordinary emergence of citizen-centered city-states transformed Greece into a society that defeated the mighty Persian Empire. Yet Philip and Alexander of Macedon were able to beat the Greeks in the Battle of Chaeronea in 338 BCE, a victory made possible by the Macedonians' appropriation of Greek innovations. After Alexander's death, battle-hardened warlords fought ruthlessly over the remnants of his empire. But Greek cities remained populous and wealthy, their economy and culture surviving to be passed on to the Romans—and to us. A compelling narrative filled with uncanny modern parallels, this is a book for anyone interested in how great civilizations are born and die. This book is based on evidence available on a new interactive website. To learn more, please visit: http://polis.stanford.edu/.
Conflict in Ancient Greece and Rome: The Definitive Political, Social, and Military Encyclopedia [3 volumes]
Language: en
Pages: 1421
Authors: Sara E. Phang, Iain Spence Ph.D., Douglas Kelly Ph.D., Peter Londey Ph.D.
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-06-27 - Publisher: ABC-CLIO

The complex role warfare played in ancient Greek and Roman civilizations is examined through coverage of key wars and battles; important leaders, armies, organizations, and weapons; and other noteworthy aspects of conflict. • Provides an up-to-date and comprehensive treatment of conflict in the ancient Greek and Roman worlds that relates warfare to society, politics, economy, and culture • Examines major wars and other key conflicts; important generals and leaders; and Greek and Roman political, military, social, and cultural institutions • Presents ancillary information, including maps and illustrations; a topically arranged bibliography; sourcebooks of primary sources in translation; and lists of the most interesting "sound bites" attributed to Greek and Roman leaders in ancient times
Aspects of Greek History, 750-323 BC
Language: en
Pages: 542
Authors: Terry Buckley
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 1996 - Publisher: Psychology Press

Aspects of Greek History, 750 - 323 BCis an up-to-date textbook on ancient Greek history that, topic- by-topic, uses a wealth of original sources to interpret this history for those with little prior knowledge of the subject. Chapter by chapter, the relevant historical periods from the age of colonisation to Alexander the Great are reconstructed. The book covers the main literary sources: Aristotle, Diodorus, Herodotus, Plutarch, Thucydides, and Xenophon; Greek political and military history from the beginnings to Alexander's Battle of Gaugamela. It includes maps, a glosary of Greek terms, and a full bibliography. Overall, this is an indispensable collection of material for the student of classics as well as the general reader, who requires a grounding in Greek history.
The Athenian Revolution
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Josiah Ober
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-09-01 - Publisher: Princeton University Press

Where did "democracy" come from, and what was its original form and meaning? Here Josiah Ober shows that this "power of the people" crystallized in a revolutionary uprising by the ordinary citizens of Athens in 508-507 B.C. He then examines the consequences of the development of direct democracy for upper-and lower-class citizens, for dissident Athenian intellectuals, and for those who were denied citizenship under the new regime (women, slaves, resident foreigners), as well as for the general development of Greek history. When the citizens suddenly took power into their own hands, they changed the cultural and social landscape of Greece, thereby helping to inaugurate the Classical Era. Democracy led to fundamental adjustments in the basic structures of Athenian society, altered the forms and direction of political thinking, and sparked a series of dramatic reorientations in international relations. It quickly made Athens into the most powerful Greek city-state, but it also fatally undermined the traditional Greek rules of warfare. It stimulated the development of the Western tradition of political theorizing and encouraged a new conception of justice that has striking parallels to contemporary theories of rights. But Athenians never embraced the notions of inherency and inalienability that have placed the concept of rights at the center of modern political thought. Thus the play of power that constituted life in democratic Athens is revealed as at once strangely familiar and desperately foreign, and the values sustaining the Athenian political community as simultaneously admirable and terrifying.
Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece
Language: en
Pages: 242
Authors: Kurt A. Raaflaub, Josiah Ober, Robert Wallace
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2008-10-15 - Publisher: Univ of California Press

"A balanced, high-quality analysis of the developing nature of Athenian political society and its relationship to 'democracy' as a timeless concept."—Mark Munn, author of The School of History